YouTube for Authors

My latest news is that I’m on YouTube. I have four videos up. One is a channel trailer. The other three are trailers for my book The Dragon Sleeps.

Please go and have a look.

If you’re an author and like the idea for yourself, please let me know. We can follow each other.

 

The Dragon Sleeps – 5 Star Review

I was so thrilled to receive this wonderful  5 Star Review on Goodreads  from

walkingfortheloveofbooks

Thank you so very much. Reviews are so important to writers, even just a word or two is sufficient to raise the book through the levels to best seller lists.

the-dragon-sleeps-ebook-cover

It was amazing

The Dragon Sleep is set in the 1920s – Australia.

Alexandra Thornton is 21 years old and loves historic objects, because of her passion, she is interested in working in her Dads antique shop – Thornton Antiques.

Alexandra lives in Thornton Park and lives on the family estate. A zoo is also attached to the estate with kangaroos, wallabies, etc.

A mystery murder takes place in Thornton Park and Alexandra takes it upon herself to try and solve it.

I was drawn to The Dragon Sleeps because of the beauty of the building on the book cover, which is an actual building in Victoria, Australia.

Ellen Read loves architure buildings and this was quite evident in her book as she describes the home layout. Her love of flowers which she has a passion for are also a feature in her book, names like, blue salvias, pink petunias, etc.

The mystery murder I touched on very briefly because – Ellen Read Author – has just launched her own – You Tube – channel, that will give you a clue on the mystery.

Thank you Ellen Read, for such a wonderful book, beautifully written, with such amazing details which I felt lost in.

I very much appreciate your hard work that went into making such a little beauty.

Writer Talks: I was so thrilled to be interviewed by fellow Australian author, Nadia L King

I recently interviewed Queensland author, Ellen Read about writing, self-publishing, and what it’s like to undertake research for historical fiction… NLK: How did you first begin writing fiction? ER: I began with reading books. I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t reading and living in a story. As a child I made up fictional […]

via Writer Talks: Ellen Read — Nadia L King, Author

1920s Men’s Fashion

My new novel The Dragon Sleeps is set in Victoria, Australia in the 1920s. I recently did a post on women’s fashion from that era.

Men’s fashion was equally as stylish. It was influenced by the new heart-throbs of the silent films, although the term ‘silent films’ wasn’t used during that era. They were called ‘the flicks’ or ‘the pictures’.

Rudolph Valentino liked to set a style.

clark-gable
Clark Gable shows an example of men’s hair styles that were slicked back and held in place with brilliantine cream.

John Gilbert wears the pencil-style moustache that was popular during the 1920s and 1930s. He was known as The Great Lover of the Silver Screen. The Merry Widow launched him to fame in 1925, and by 1928 he was the highest paid actor in Hollywood.

Benedict Archer in The Dragon Sleeps looks like John Gilbert, or so Edith claims.

Men in the 1920s wore suits and, at least the highly fashionable ones, wore many accessories. There were so many types  of hats (here we see fedoras, straw boaters, and Newsboy hats).

Below shows the Porkpie hat that Sergeant Smith wears when he accompanies Alexandra and Edith to the Victorian State Library.

mens-hats

 

Canes were popular accessories as well as small rings, tie pins, and collar pins. Three-piece suits were also worn – one for every occassion.

Shoes were very stylish, with examples here of brogues, two-tones, white tennis shoes and the exquisite art deco shoes.

Even the working man and boy liked to don hats, ties and jackets.

The Parry and Brady men in The Dragon Sleeps would have worn similar outfits.

working-man-w-horse
This could easily be one of the Parry boys in The Dragon Sleeps caring for the horses.

 

I hope you enjoyed looking at male attire in the 1920s.

The Dragon Sleeps is available in paperback or as an e-book on:

Amazon

Amazon – Australia

Booktopia

Angus & Robertson

Barnes & Noble

Kobo

iBooks

I’d love to hear from you. To follow me go on to:

Instagram

Facebook

Goodreads

 

 

The Thornton Mysteries – Book Two

the-thornton-mysteries-blog

I’m excited to be working on research for book two of The Thornton Mysteries. Next week I’m heading down to Victoria to do research for the location/setting of the story. Thornton Park, as the family home, will still feature but some of the story will be in Daylesford, a beautiful village in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range. 

The Thornton Mysteries

It was originally my intention to have my newly released novel The Dragon Sleeps as a stand-alone book. As I drew close to the ending, I started to think that I should write a second book. Through all the editing, proof-reading and finally the publishing, I still hadn’t made up my mind. I had another novel I was working on and I really wanted to finish it.

I had no sooner given approval for the printing of The Dragon Sleeps, than I thought, of course I must write a second book!

the-thornton-mysteries

Since then I’ve decided to write at least two more books. They will be under the series title of The Thornton Mysteries. Each book will have a separate title, with it’s own mystery. The thread linking them will be Alexandra’s personal story.

Thornton Park  will remain the focal point of the lives of Alexandra, Benedict, Edith and Thomas, Alexandra’s father. However, the second book will also be in Daylesford, Victoria. Daylesford is a beautiful town located in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range,  approximately 115 kilometres north-west of Melbourne. It’s principally known for it’s spas, and it has many antique stores and art galleries.

The scenery in the district is pure postcard stuff!

I am going to love writing about this beautiful place. My story will be still set in the 1920s and I can’t wait to bring Daylesford to life in this exciting era. To make certain that I achieve this, in January, I’m going to Victoria and will stay at Daylesford to do some research.

I’ll be taking heaps of photos and I will feature some of them here, on Instagram and Facebook.

I hope you’ll follow me on my journey to create the second Thornton Mystery.

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The Town Hall, one of Daylesford’s beautiful buildings.

 

1920s Fashion – dresses, hats and hair

My new novel The Dragon Sleeps is set in Victoria, Australia in the 1920s. I had such fun in so many ways,  writing in this era. One of these ways was the fashion. I take a look here at ladies fashion.

1927-1928
These dresses were the rage in 1927 and 1928.

Hemlines were shortened, while waistline were lowered.

finger-waves

The 1920’s were a turning point for women. The Great War (WWI) had ended and women had become more independent. During the war, they had gone out to work for the first time.

With their new found independence, women wanted to cut ties with the old feminine images of the past.

Hair was cut short into ‘Bobs’ or styled into ‘finger waves’, so-called because the hair was dampened and fingers and comb were used to create this look.

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The cloche hat, in all its variations, was the hat of the 1920s. It clung to the head and was pulled down on to the forehead. Sometimes the cloche hat featured a brim, with flowers or feathers decorating the sides. Add pearls, beads or feathers, and the cloche could even be worn in the evening.

The woman with the golden curls and green hat – Copyright 2012 Tracy J Butler

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Stylish Art Deco hats pins  were used to keep hats in place.  The pins were surprisingly strong and sharp.                                  Alexandra and Edith, in my story, wear hat pins like these.

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This is a fabulous example of 1920s evening wear, complete with finger waves.

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These are Tabard-style evening dresses. They are typically a sheer beaded overlay, with a silk chiffon shift of the same colour or contrasting colour beneath. Tabards frequently featured low backs and thin straps.

Alexandra wears a tabard dress in The Dragon Sleeps.

The bias cut was popularized, which allowed the fabric to hang and drape in sinuous folds and stretch over the contours of a woman’s figure. The beauty of the bias cut was that the dress could be pulled on and off with ease.

It heralded the free-form look of many gowns in the 1920s.

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Chanel’s black evening dresses with huge transparent draperies.

Molyneux’s transparent printed dresses with full scalloped skirts and arm draperies.

Paquin’s acid green moire dresses with a V-neck and bulk at the hip.

source –Vintage Fashion Sourcebook – Carlton Books

The modern ‘myth’ of the ‘flapper’ party dress is more a relic of the 1960’s revival. In fact, generally the hemline was below the knee. Women enjoyed the swishing of the softer more feminine fabrics against their legs. Silk, velvet and taffeta were the favoured fabrics.

Many gowns were designed with the new dances in mind. Freedom of movement was important.

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A page from the Ladies Home Journal, May 1927